Western University HistoryWestern Social Science

First Term Courses

9274A - Oh Gendered Canada: Gender in Canadian History

This course will explore the ways in which gender—largely, the social construction of masculinity and femininity—has played a role in Canadian history, and will examine some of the major historiographical debates that have surrounded this complex topic. These debates often also address the related issues of race, class, and sexuality. This course will challenge students to employ gender as an integral tool of historical analysis, and to reconsider conventional narratives in Canadian history.

Fall 2014-15 9274A M. Halpern Tues 9:30-11:30
Lawson Hall 1227
Syllabus


9403A-001 - Eigtheenth Century English Society

This course explores English society in the eighteenth century, looking first at the social hierarchy and then turning to gender roles and relations, religion, the eighteenth-century landscape, the birth of a consumer society and the new industrialism which fed it, eighteenth-century constructions of “home,” leisure activities, the rise of sentiment, and the way in which social relations played out in the criminal justice system. We will conclude by focusing on Georgian London. The class will also participate in a shared reading experience over the course of the term, each student reporting on a volume of Samuel Richardson’s novel Clarissa.

Fall 2014-15 9403A A. May Mon 11:30-1:30pm
Lawson Hall 1218
 syllabus


9800a - Public History: Theory, History and Practice

This course introduces the field of public history: history as it is interpreted for and understood by the public. Topics include: authenticity, commemoration, “imagined communities,” the invention of tradition, “usable pasts,” contested places, colonialism and culture, historical designation and preservation, heritage tourism, public policy, cultural (mis)representation, oral history, ethics, gender and class, the natural and built environment, education vs. entertainment, and social memory. Through readings, guest speakers, site visits, workshops, and projects, students explore the theoretical concerns underlying the field and learn the methods and skills practiced by public historians today. Required for Public History students; not open to other graduate students.

Fall 2013-14 9800a M.Dove TU 11:30-2:30
Lawson Hall 2270C
 Syllabus 


9806a - Understanding Archives: The Management of Primary Sources in the Digital Age

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of professional archival work. Class sessions will primarily be lecture driven, but combine discussion, practical exercises, and demonstrations. Students will gain a solid grounding in the history of the profession, an understanding of basic archival terminology, principles, theory, as well as an appreciation of current practices and how digital technologies have impacted both archival management and public programming. Optional for Public History students; open to other graduate students with the instructor's permission.

Fall 2014-15 9806a D. Spanner TH 6:30-9:30pm
Stevenson Hall 3166
Syllabus


9808a - Digital History

Digital history is the use of computers, digital media, and other tools for historical practice, presentation, analysis, and research. This course emphasizes both the presentation of history on the web, and the use of computational techniques to work with digital resources. Required for Public History students; open to other graduate students with the instructor's permission.

Digital history students may also be interested in the companion studio course, History 9832b: Interactive Exhibit Design, offered in the Winter Term.

Fall 2014-15 9808a Andrew Ross Mon 12:00-3:00
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus


9809a - Social Memory

This course is an introduction to the phenomenon of social memory in various modern societies. It will address such matters as the commemoration of historical events and the meanings conferred on them, conflicts over different versions of history, the construction of collective identities around historical events, and the influence of historical events on modern nationalisms. In each case, there will be an attempt to understand the continuing impact of the past on the present. The seminar readings will be divided into themes, with each week’s readings examining a different case study of the theme.

Winter 2014-15 9809a J. Vance Mon 9:30-11:30am
Lawson Hall 2270C
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9831a - Killing Fields: A Global History of Mass Violence

This seminar explores the causes, cases, contours, and consequences of mass violence in modern history. The course draws on theoretical perspectives from anthropology, history, sociology, law, political science, social psychology, and philosophy to develop a coherent analytical matrix for understanding mass violence. We will discuss conceptual frameworks and apply to them a number of case studies including the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, and genocides in Cambodia and Rwanda. We will study victims and perpetrators, analyze the role of gender, examine, rescue, resistance, intervention and prevention, and discuss the multiple functions of social memory to post-conflict justice.

Fall 2014-15 9831a F. Schumacher W 9:30-11:30
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus 


9833a - Environmental History

Environmental history explores the history of human beings and the natural environment: how people have thought about, and interacted with, nature. While introducing the main concepts and debates of the international field, this seminar course will trace an environmental history of Canada, particularly through the past two centuries.

Fall 2014-15 9833a A. MacEachern Thurs 9:30-11:30
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus


9850A - Methods and Practice in History

This is a course about how historians do history. Through critical readings, engaged discussions, and informed analysis of historical methods and tools, students will equip themselves with the skills necessary to study and write history in graduate school and after. Working from a primary source and relevant secondary literature, each student will explore an appropriate theoretical and analytical framework to prepare a conference-length paper for presentation at the end of the semester.

Winter 2014-15 9850A M. Kellow Thurs 1:30-3:30pm
Lawson Hall 2270C
 Syllabus 


9877a - Digital Research Methods

Historical research now crucially involves the acquisition and use of digital sources. In this class, students will learn to find, harvest, manage, excerpt, cluster, and analyze digital materials throughout the research process, from initial exploratory forays through the production of an electronic article or monograph which is ready to submit for publication.

Fall 2014-15 9877a W. Turkel Wed 6:30-9:30pm
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus