3000 Level Courses

2018-19 Academic Year

Course outlines will be made available on or before June 15th 2018.

3204G - French Canada

An overview of the cultural, political, and economic history of French Canada since the Conquest of 1759. Particular attention will be paid to the growth of nationalism, the formation of identity, as well as the development of cultural, religious, and political institutions.
2 hours.

Antirequisite(s): History 3203E

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above

Winter 3204G J.Vacante Tuesday 11:30-1:30am Syllabus

3205E - Identities in Conflict: Canadian Social History Since 1800

This course examines the social history of Canada since 1800, including such topics as industrialization, urbanization, class struggle, labour strife, rural depopulation, immigration and migration, ethnic tension, racism, gender struggle, sexuality, social reform, religion, culture, and regionalism. Considerable attention will be paid to the historiography and/or methodologies of the field.
2 hours, 1.0 course.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above

Fall/Winter 3205E M.Halpern Wednesday 2:30-4:30pm Syllabus

3226F - Canadian Political Leadership

This course focuses on leadership styles of the most influential, innovative, and frequently controversial prime ministers and provincial premiers from the 1860s to the present. Emphasis is placed on the interplay of character, circumstance, pragmatism and principle in governing a nation as ethnically diverse and regionally fragmented as Canada. 
2 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3297F/G taken in 2009 and 2010.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.
Fall 3226F K.Fleming Wednesday 6:30-8:30pm Syllabus

3306F - The United States in the Nineteenth Century

This course explores social change, economic and territorial expansion, and slavery in 19th-century U.S. history. Students learn to identify and question the frameworks that shape how historians narrate this history to students and to the public, especially American Exceptionalism and the idea that American history is a story of “progress.”
3 hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3305E
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.
Fall 3306F L.Shire Tuesday 10:30am-12:30pm Syllabus

3310G- Advanced American Studies: Being American

What defines being “American”?  How is the American identity constructed, and how and why is it frequently contested?  This course employs an interdisciplinary approach to explore the meaning(s) and definition(s) of American identity from multiple viewpoints, and within the context of US history, politics, regions, values, and culture. 
2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): American Studies 3310F/G
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above orenrolment in an American Studies module.

Winter 3310G A. Sendzikas Tuesday 2:30-4:30pm Syllabus

3320E - Global America: The United States in World Affairs, 1700 to the Present

Throughout its history the United States has imagined itself as a global project. To better understand America's role in the world and the impact of international developments on the United States, this seminar explores the political, economic, military, and cultural dimensions of U.S. interaction with the world since the 18th century.
2 hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3319E
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2300, 3300 or 4300 level or enrolment in the Honors Specialization in International Relations.
This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program
Fall/Winter 3320E F. Schumacher Friday 9:30-11:30am Syllabus

3326F - Atomic America: The United States During the 1950s

This seminar examines some key aspects of political, social, and cultural life in the United States during the 1950s. Topics include social classes, urban and suburban growth, family and gender relations, McCarthyism, and civil rights movements. The impact and legacy of events and issues of the 1950s are evaluated.
3 hours, 0.5 course

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Antirequisite(s): History 3396F/G if taken in 2011-2012
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above.

Fall 3326F A. Sendzikas Wednesday 10:30am-1:30pm Syllabus

3427E - The Holocaust

This course explores the evolution of the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question” in the broader context of German and Jewish history and anti-Semitic ideologies. The Holocaust is analyzed from the perspective of the perpetrators, victims and bystanders. The ultimate goal is to enable students to understand how and why the Holocaust happened.
3 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter 3427E K. Priestman Monday 6:30-9:30pm Syllabus

3513F - The Cuban Revolution: Origins and Legacy

The Cuban Revolution was a seminal event that affected Cuba and all Latin American countries, and shaped their relations with the United States during the second half of the twentieth century. This course analyzes the causes of the Cuban Revolution and consequences for Cuba and the rest of Latin America.
2 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): History 3596G taken in 2010 or summer 2011
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above
This course counts as a World course.
This course counts as a History credit in the International Relations program.
Fall 3513F L.M.Hernandez-Saenz Monday 9:30-11:30am Syllabus

3601E - Chinese Nationalism in History

A thematic exploration of the crucial developments and problems in Chinese history since 1800.
3 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter 3601E J.Flath Tuesday 2:30-5:30pm Syllabus

3604F - Tokugawa Japan: Samurai, Peasants, Townsfolk, and Outsiders

This course will investigate Japan's historical development during the Tokugawa shogunate between 1600 and 1868. Themes will include social and political structures, intellectual and cultural developments, commerce and urbanization, and Tokugawa Japan's relations with other countries.
3 hours.

Antirequisite(s): The former History 3603E
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above. 

Fall 3604F C. Young Thursday 9:30am-12:30pm Syllabus

3605E - Crusaders & Moslems in the Twelfth Century

Aspects of Frankish and Moslem Societies and Cultures in the Middle East.
2 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program.
This course counts as a World credit.

Fall/Winter 3605E M. Shatzmiller Monday 4:30-6:30pm Syllabus

3606G - Japan and its Empire, 1868-1945: A Rising and Setting Sun

An investigation of the processes that created Japan's modern nation-state and Asia-Pacific empire between the Meiji Restoration of 1868 and Japan's defeat in World War II in 1945. Themes will include political and economic developments and their impact on society and culture in both Japan and its imperial possessions.
3 hours.

Antirequisite(s): The former History 3603E.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Winter 3606G C. Young Thursday 9:30am-12:30pm Syllabus

3717G - The Global Cold War

This seminar examines the development of the Cold War from its ideological and political origins to its sudden, and arguably unexpected, end. It traces the evolution of the conflict from Europe to Asia to Africa, concluding with an assessment of how this geopolitical conflict has defined the modern world.
2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3797F/G, if taken in 2010-11, 2012-13, 2013-14.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Winter 3717G G. Stewart Monday 11:30am-1:30pm Syllabus

3722G - 'Killing Fields': Genocide in Modern History

This seminar explores the causes, elements, and consequences of genocide in modern history through historical case studies and multidisciplinary perspectives.
2 hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Winter 3722G F. Schumacher Friday 11:30am-1:30pm Syllabus

3723F - The Anthropocene: History of a Human Planet

Humans of late have exerted so much influence on the Earth, and created what are essentially permanent changes to it, that some scientists and scholars argue we are in a new age not just in human history, but in Earth history: the Anthropocene. This seminar course is a global environmental history of the recent past. 
3 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Fall 3723F A. MacEachern Thursday 1:30-4:30pm Syllabus

3813E - Public History

An exploration of history as it is understood by and interpreted for the public in varied venues and media, including museums, historic sites, historical fiction, the internet, and film. Topics include the history of public history, ethical practice, the relationships between form and content and between public and academic history.
2 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Fall/Winter 3813E M.Dove Monday 2:30-4:30pm Syllabus

3814G - Kicking & Screaming: Women's Protest Movements in 19th & 20th Century Canada & the United States

This course will focus on female protest movements whose primary goal was to better the lives of women. With attention to issues of gender, sexuality, race, and class, it will explore various conditions that gave rise to rebellion, and will assess the movements' strategies and achievements.
3 hours.

Antirequisite(s): History 2813F/G 
Prerequisite(s):
 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Winter 3814G M. Halpern Tuesday 10:30am-1:30pm Syllabus

3823G - Global Twenty-First Century History

A thematic introduction to 21st-century history focused on phenomena that characterize our age: the global connectivity of supply chains, planetary-scale computation, the War on Terror, and unprecedented ecological change. Contemporary events are contextualized in an interdisciplinary fashion at time scales ranging from days to millions of years.
2 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s):
 Any 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Winter 3823G B. Turkel Wednesday 11:30am-1:30pm Syllabus