Western University HistoryWestern Social Science

3000 Level Courses

2016-17 Academic Year

Course outlines will be made available on or before June 15th 2016.

3204F - French Canada

An overview of the cultural, political, and economic history of French Canada since the Conquest of 1759. Particular attention will be paid to the growth of nationalism, the formation of identity, as well as the development of cultural, religious, and political institutions.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above

Fall 3204F-001 J.Vacante Wednesday 2:30-4:30 Syllabus

3205E - Identities in Conflict: Canadian Social History Since 1800

This course examines the social history of Canada since 1800, including such topics as industrialization, urbanization, class struggle, labour strife, rural depopulation, immigration and migration, ethnic tension, racism, gender struggle, sexuality, social reform, religion, culture, and regionalism. Considerable attention will be paid to the historiography and/or methodologies of the field. 2 hours, 1.0 course.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above

Fall/Winter 3205E-001 M.Halpern Wednesday 3:30-5:30 Syllabus

3306F - The United States in the Nineteenth Century

This course explores social change, economic and territorial expansion, and slavery in 19th-century U.S. history. Students learn to identify and question the frameworks that shape how historians narrate this history to students and to the public, especially American Exceptionalism and the idea that American history is a story of “progress.” 3 hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3305E
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.
Fall 3306F-001 L.Shire Wednesday 11:30-1:30 Syllabus

3326F - Atomic America: The United States During the 1950s

This seminar examines some key aspects of political, social, and cultural life in the United States during the 1950s. Topics include social classes, urban and suburban growth, family and gender relations, McCarthyism, and civil rights movements. The impact and legacy of events and issues of the 1950s are evaluated. 3 hours, 0.5 course

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Antirequisite(s): History 3396F/G if taken in 2011-2012
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above.

Fall 3326F-001 A. Sendzikas Monday 9:30-12:30 Syllabus

3412G - Britain's Sailors, Soldiers, and Empire: 1689-1902

This course examines the emergence of Britain as an imperial power in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and the military means by which that empire was acquired (and lost). It explores both soldiers' and sailors' lives and the effects of war on state formation and national identity within Britain. 2 hours, 0.5 course

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above

Winter 3412G-001 A.May Tuesday 9:30-12:30pm Syllabus

3415E - Modern Germany, 1815 to the Present

An examination of the conflict between liberalism and reaction in the nineteenth century; the effects of industrialization; unification and its consequences; the causes and consequences of the First World War; the rise of Nazism and the nature of Nazi rule; the post-war German states; and Germany in the post-unification era. 3 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter 3415E-001 K. Priestman Monday 6:00-9:00pm Syllabus

3420F - The Soviet Experiment

The rise and fall of the Soviet Union had a profound impact on European and global affairs. Yet for many, Russia remains an enigma. This course examines the politics, economics, social issues, cultures and religions of the peoples who lived in the USSR, Russians and non-Russians, and how they interacted. 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): The former History 439E.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall 3420F-001 M.Dyczok Wednesday 4:30-6:30pm Syllabus

3423G- North of the Wall: Scotland from Foundations to 1603

The creation of the kingdom of Scotland and of a sense of Scottish identity, from beginnings up to the union of the crowns of Scotland and England in 1603. Topics include Scottish geography, the racial composition of the Kingdom and the role of church and crown in uniting the country. 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): The former History 399F if taken between 2003-04 and 2006-07.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Winter 3423G-001 B. Murison Monday 10:30-12:30pm Syllabus


3427E - The Holocaust

This course explores the evolution of the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question” in the broader context of German and Jewish history and anti-Semitic ideologies. The Holocaust is analyzed from the perspective of the perpetrators, victims and bystanders. The ultimate goal is to enable students to understand how and why the Holocaust happened. 3 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): The former History 394E if taken in 2006-07.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter 3427E-001 K. Priestman Wednesday 6:00-9:00pm Syllabus

3513F - The Cuban Revolution: Origins and Legacy

The Cuban Revolution was a seminal event that affected Cuba and all Latin American countries, and shaped their relations with the United States during the second half of the twentieth century. This course analyzes the causes of the Cuban Revolution and consequences for Cuba and the rest of Latin America. 2 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): History 3596G taken in 2010 or summer 2011
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above
This course counts as a World course.
This course counts as a History credit in the International Relations program.
Fall 3513F-001 L.M.Hernandez-Saenz

Tuesday 4:30-6:30pm

Syllabus

3601E - Chinese Nationalism in History

A thematic exploration of the crucial developments and problems in Chinese history since 1800. 3 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter 3601E-001 J.Flath

Monday 9:30-12:30pm

Syllabus

3605E - Crusaders & Moslems in the Twelfth Century

Aspects of Frankish and Moslem Societies and Cultures in the Middle East. 2 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program.

This course counts as a World credit.

Fall/Winter 3605E-001 M. Shatzmiller Thursday 2:30-4:30 Syllabus

3609G - Japan Since 1945

Selected topics, such as Japan's phenomenal economic growth, its competitive drive for the control of world markets, big business in politics, the debates on the Constitutional revision and remilitarization, student radicalism and the changing roles of women in contemporary Japan, are examined. 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program.

This course counts as World credit.

Winter 3609G-001 C.Young Thursday 1:30-3:30 Syllabus

3717G - The Global Cold War

This seminar examines the development of the Cold War from its ideological and political origins to its sudden, and arguably unexpected, end. It traces the evolution of the conflict from Europe to Asia to Africa, concluding with an assessment of how this geopolitical conflict has defined the modern world. 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3797F/G, if taken in 2010-11, 2012-13, 2013-14.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Winter 3717G-001 G. Stewart Tuesday 11:30-1:30 Syllabus

3722F - 'Killing Fields': Genocide in Modern History

This seminar explores the causes, elements, and consequences of genocide in modern history through historical case studies and multidisciplinary perspectives. 2 hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s):
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall 3722F-001 F.Schumacher Friday 10:30-12:30pm Syllabus

3808G- Jewish Life In North America Since 1880

This course examines the history of Jews in the United States and Canada, highlighting their changing family, spiritual, social, and work lives, exploring themes of identity, assimilation, activism, and upward mobility, and considering how Jews have helped shape North American life through their struggles and achievements. 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Winter 3808G-001 M. Halpern Tuesday 12:30-2:30pm Syllabus


3813E - Public History

An exploration of history as it is understood by and interpreted for the public in varied venues and media, including museums, historic sites, historical fiction, the internet, and film. Topics include the history of public history, ethical practice, the relationships between form and content and between public and academic history. 3 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Fall/Winter 3813E-001 M.Dove Monday 2:30-4:30 Syllabus

Back to Top