3000 Level Courses

2017-18 Academic Year

Course outlines will be made available on or before June 15th 2017.

3204G - French Canada

An overview of the cultural, political, and economic history of French Canada since the Conquest of 1759. Particular attention will be paid to the growth of nationalism, the formation of identity, as well as the development of cultural, religious, and political institutions.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above

Winter 3204G J.Vacante Tuesday 11:30-1:30 Syllabus

3205E - Identities in Conflict: Canadian Social History Since 1800

This course examines the social history of Canada since 1800, including such topics as industrialization, urbanization, class struggle, labour strife, rural depopulation, immigration and migration, ethnic tension, racism, gender struggle, sexuality, social reform, religion, culture, and regionalism. Considerable attention will be paid to the historiography and/or methodologies of the field. 2 hours, 1.0 course.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above

Fall/Winter 3205E M.Halpern Wednesday 2:30-4:30 Syllabus

3221E - Topics in Ontario History

Topics include aspects of the political, social and economic history of the province. 3 hour seminar course, 1.0 course.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above

Fall/Winter 3221E P.Krats Thursday 1:30-4:30 Syllabus

3226G - Canadian Political Leadership

This course focuses on leadership styles of the most influential, innovative, and frequently controversial prime ministers and provincial premiers from the 1860s to the present. Emphasis is placed on the interplay of character, circumstance, pragmatism and principle in governing a nation as ethnically diverse and regionally fragmented as Canada. 2 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3297F/G taken in 2009 and 2010.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.
Winter 3226G K.Fleming Wednesday 6:30-8:30 Syllabus

3227F - Political Protest in Canadian History

This course focuses on the many expressions, from peaceful to violent, of political protest in Canada between the 1820s and the present. Protest groups examined include the Upper and Lower Canadian rebels, laborers and agrarians, intellectuals, left- and right-wing extremists, youths and students, feminists, Quebec separatists, and First Nations. 2 lecture/seminar hours

Antirequisite(s): History 3298F/G taken in 2009 and 2010.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above.

Fall 3227F K.Fleming Tuesday 11:30-1:30 Syllabus

3230E - Transnational Canada, 1815 to Present

This course takes a thematic approach to examine the impact of transnationalism on Canadian history in the 19th and 20th centuries. A transnational history of Canada both challenges and complements national histories and transcends traditional borders by situating ideas, peoples, and events in connected networks and in a global context. 3 hours, 1.0 course.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above.

Fall/Winter 3230E P.Krats Monday 11:30-2:30 Syllabus

3320E - Global America: The United States in World Affairs, 1700 to the Present

This Throughout its history the United States has imagined itself as a global project. To better understand America’s role in the world and the impact of international developments on the United States, this seminar explores the political, economic, military, and cultural dimensions of U.S. interaction with the world since the 18th century.

Antirequisite(s): History 3319E
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2300, 3300 or 4300 level or enrolment in the Honors Specialization in International Relations.
Extra Information: 2 hours, 1.0 course.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter 3320E F.Schumacher Friday 9:30-11:30 Syllabus

3402G - Homer to St. Augustine: Classic Texts and Debates in Western Culture (I)

Homer’s Odyssey, Aristotle’s Ethics, the Hebrew Bible, and St. Augustine’s Confessions, which influenced both the ages in which they were composed and subsequent Western thought, depict distinctive and often conflicting ideals for the individual and society. The class examines these ideals and the larger debates they embody and reflect. 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above

Winter 3402G E.Nathans Thursday 9:30-11:30 Syllabus

3412G - Britain's Sailors, Soldiers, and Empire: 1689-1902

This course examines the emergence of Britain as an imperial power in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and the military means by which that empire was acquired (and lost). It explores both soldiers' and sailors' lives and the effects of war on state formation and national identity within Britain. 2 hours, 0.5 course

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above

Winter 3412G A.May Thursday 1:30-4:30 Syllabus

3415E - Modern Germany, 1815 to the Present

An examination of the conflict between liberalism and reaction in the nineteenth century; the effects of industrialization; unification and its consequences; the causes and consequences of the First World War; the rise of Nazism and the nature of Nazi rule; the post-war German states; and Germany in the post-unification era. 3 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter 3415E E.Nathans Monday 2:30-4:30 and Wednesday 4:30-5:30 Syllabus

3420F - The Soviet Experiment

The rise and fall of the Soviet Union had a profound impact on European and global affairs. Yet for many, Russia remains an enigma. This course examines the politics, economics, social issues, cultures and religions of the peoples who lived in the USSR, Russians and non-Russians, and how they interacted. 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): The former History 439E.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall 3420F M.Dyczok Thursday 10:30-12:30 Syllabus

3427E - The Holocaust

This course explores the evolution of the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question” in the broader context of German and Jewish history and anti-Semitic ideologies. The Holocaust is analyzed from the perspective of the perpetrators, victims and bystanders. The ultimate goal is to enable students to understand how and why the Holocaust happened. 3 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): The former History 394E if taken in 2006-07.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter 3427E K. Priestman Monday 6:30-9:30pm Syllabus

3613G - The Koreas Since 1945

This course will investigate developments in North and South Korea since 1945. Topics will include the Korean War; economic development, military dictatorship, and democratisation in South Korea; the consolidation of the Kim family state in North Korea; and the role of the Korean peninsula in international relations in the Asia-Pacific. 3 seminar hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Winter 3613G C.Young

Thursday 9:30-12:30pm

Syllabus

3709E - Iberian Empires: Portugal, Spain and their American Colonies in a Global Context, 1400-1810

This course will examine the history and legacy of Portugal, Spain and their American colonies in a global context. It will focus on the political, economic, social, geographic, scientific and technological factors that contributed to the formation and development of the first European transatlantic empires.3 hours, 1.0 course.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter 3709E L.M.Hernandez-Saenz Tuesday 1:30-4:30 Syllabus

3717G - The Global Cold War

This seminar examines the development of the Cold War from its ideological and political origins to its sudden, and arguably unexpected, end. It traces the evolution of the conflict from Europe to Asia to Africa, concluding with an assessment of how this geopolitical conflict has defined the modern world. 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3797F/G, if taken in 2010-11, 2012-13, 2013-14.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Winter 3717G G. Stewart Monday 12:30-2:30 Syllabus

3721G - Climate of the Past, Present, and Future

This course explores the role of climate in history, from the last ice age to the present. There are special emphases on Canadians’ relationship with climate, the development of meteorology in the 19th and 20th century, and the part that history plays in documenting and understanding climate change.

Antirequisite(s):
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above or Geography  2133A/B.
Winter 3721G A.MacEachern Friday 11:30-2:30pm Syllabus

3722G - 'Killing Fields': Genocide in Modern History

This seminar explores the causes, elements, and consequences of genocide in modern history through historical case studies and multidisciplinary perspectives. 2 hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s):
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Winter 3722G F.Schumacher Friday 11:30-1:30 Syllabus

3808F- Jewish Life In North America Since 1880

This course examines the history of Jews in the United States and Canada, highlighting their changing family, spiritual, social, and work lives, exploring themes of identity, assimilation, activism, and upward mobility, and considering how Jews have helped shape North American life through their struggles and achievements. 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Fall 3808F M. Halpern Monday 9:30-11:30 Syllabus


3813E - Public History

An exploration of history as it is understood by and interpreted for the public in varied venues and media, including museums, historic sites, historical fiction, the internet, and film. Topics include the history of public history, ethical practice, the relationships between form and content and between public and academic history. 2 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Fall/Winter 3813E M.Dove Monday 2:30-4:30 Syllabus