4000 Level Courses

2017-18 Academic Year

Course outlines will be made available on or before June 15th 2017.

4208G - Canada and the Age of Conflict, 1896-1945 Class

"Modern" Canada was largely shaped between 1896 and 1945, decades that witnessed a massive immigration boom, two world wars, and an economic depression. This upper-year seminar course will examine such issues as politics, war, regionalism, culture, gender, sexuality, modernity, class, race, ethnicity, religion, industrialization, urbanization, nationalism, foreign affairs, and age/generation. 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Antirequisite(s): History 4207E
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

Winter 4208G R. Wardhaugh Tuesday 12:30-2:30 Syllabus


4410F- Crime and Society in England, 1800–1900

This seminar explores nineteenth-century reform of the criminal law: the rise of modern policing and the transformation of both the criminal trial and punishment. It considers the impact of gender and class on definitions of crime and the treatment of offenders as well as the historiography of criminal justice. 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): History 4411E
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

Fall 4410F A. May Monday 2:30-4:30 Syllabus


4445E - The Nazi Occupation of Europe

This course focuses on Nazi occupation of Western and Eastern Europe (1938-1945), resistance and collaboration, exploitation of prisoners of war and slave labour, and the relationship between occupation policies and the Holocaust. It also explores how, in the early phase of Allied occupation of Germany, the occupiers became the occupied.

Antirequisite(s): History 4492E when taught in 2011-2012, 2013-2014, 2014-2015, and 2016-2017.
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter 4445E K. Priestman Tuesday 2:30-5:30 Syllabus

4603F - Silk Roads and Spice Routes: Ancient and Medieval Asia and World Contacts

This course will investigate the economic, political, religious, cultural, and technological impact of long distance land and sea trade between Asia and other world regions in ancient and medieval times up to around 1500.  3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall 4603F C.Young Tuesday 11:30-2:30 Syllabus

4607G - History of Women and Gender Relations in Africa

In the past African women were powerful leaders, strong economic contributors and respected members of their extended families. This course will examine these historical roles as well as factors that undermined African women's status and changed gender relations, such as slavery, economic forces and colonialism. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): Women's Studies 4607F/G.
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 courses in History or Women's Studies, taken at the 2200 level or above if they are History courses or at the 2000 level or above if they are Women's Studies courses.
Winter 4607G K.McKenna Thursday 1:30-4:30 Syllabus

4701E - Canada and the United States

This course analyses and compares a variety of themes which have been important in the development of both Canadian and American society. It also examines the involved and often difficult relationship of Canada and the United States, with an emphasis on the patterns of political, social, economic and military interaction. 2 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter 4701E J. Vacante Thursday 10:30-12:30 Syllabus

4709E - The First World War: A Revolutionary Experience

This research-intensive course is intended to provide an examination of selected aspects of the First World War, including its origins and aftermath, in a variety of combatant nations. Among the themes to be discussed are the alliance system, the experience of battle, conflicts on the home front, social factors, strategic and tactical decision-making, and the memory of the war. Students will have an opportunity to debate the most contentious historiographical issues surrounding the war and use a wide range of primary-source materials, both in discussions and assignments. 2 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter 4709E J. Vance Tuesday 9:30-11:30 Syllabus

4805E - Warfare

Selected topics in the history of warfare. 3 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above.

Fall/Winter 4805E B.Millman Wednesday 2:30-5:30 Syllabus

4000 Level International Relations Program Courses

IR 4702E - Contemporary Challenges in the Global Community

The capstone seminar in the IR Honors Specialization applies historical and political science approaches to challenges relevant to Canada and the global community today. Students initiate, direct, and produce a major group project with a public policy focus aimed at the Government of Canada and/or the global community. 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): the former International Relations 4701E.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in the Honors Specialization in International Relations module.

Fall/Winter IR-4702E F.McKenzie
D.Bousfield
Monday 10:30-12:30 Syllabus