Western University HistoryWestern Social Science

Graduate Courses

2016-17 Academic Year

Fall Term Courses | Winter Term Courses | Summer CoursesCourse Timetable at a Glance

All graduate courses in History are small seminar or studio classes of about 5-15 students. Students begin online registration for Fall Term courses in early August and for Winter Term courses in early December. Non-History students will be able to enroll in Fall Term courses on August 15th. Registration for both terms closes at the end of the first week of classes, and changes will not be permitted after that point. 

Course offerings and timetable are subject to change. 

Fall Term (September-December 2016)

9307A - Early America and the Atlantic World

This graduate course on early American history examines the settlement of the mainland British colonies of North America in the 1600s and 1700s, their development in the context of a British Atlantic world, the American Revolution, and the formation of the early U.S. republic. Particular attention is paid to understanding the character and diversity of British colonialism and the formation of the United States through comparisons with other New World empires as well as the rich context of the multi-national, multi-ethnic Atlantic World. 

Fall
2016-2017
9307A N. Rhoden Mondays
9:30 AM-11:30 AM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus

9416A - The Victorians at Home: 19th Century Britain

This course examines the domestic experience of men and women in nineteenth-century Britain. It covers both physical premises, from urban slums through suburban villas and country estates, and their inhabitants both upstairs and down. Topics include the domestic ideal, gender roles, and master/servant relations. Students will be expected to read the Steinbach text for general background knowledge, plus at least one source from each weekly list. We will also collectively make our way through Middlemarch. Often cited as the greatest 19th c English novel, it addresses many of the themes highlighted in academic studies of the period

Fall
2016-2017
9416A A. May Mondays
11:30 AM-1:30 PM
LwH 1218
Syllabus

9800A - Public History: Theory, History and Practice

This course introduces the field of public history: history as it is interpreted for and understood by the public. Topics include: authenticity, commemoration, “imagined communities,” the invention of tradition, “usable pasts,” contested places, colonialism and culture, historical designation and preservation, heritage tourism, public policy, cultural (mis)representation, oral history, ethics, gender and class, the natural and built environment, education vs. entertainment, and social memory. Through readings, guest speakers, site visits, workshops, and projects, students explore the theoretical concerns underlying the field and learn the methods and skills practiced by public historians today. Required for Public History students; not open to other graduate students.

Fall
2016-2017
9800a M. Dove Tuesdays
11:30 AM-2:30 PM
Lawson Hall 1218
Syllabus (2015-16)

9803A - Critical Moments in Women's and Gender History

This course will focus on some key moments in women’s and gender history primarily in the history of Europe, but also in other parts of the world. Key themes will be the evolution of women’s/gender history over time, how history changes when we look outside of the political history of male elites, debates about historical periodization and interpretation, whether women’s status has progressed or regressed over time, how women have been viewed historically in colonized states and debates over sexuality. Students will be given the opportunity to write an essay which will explore a topic in women’s/gender history of their choice.

Fall
2016-2017
9803A K. McKenna Tuesdays
1:30 PM-4:30 PM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus

9804A - Canada and Its Historians

This course provides an analysis of the field of modern Canadian history by focusing on thirteen established topics and examining the most relevant works. The course offers an in depth study of post-Confederation Canadian history and historiography. The aims and outcomes focus on reading, discussing, and writing. The course provides excellent preparation for doctoral candidates preparing for comprehensive examinations in the field of Canadian history, but is by no means limited to PhD students; MA students make up the majority of the class.

Fall
2016-2017
9804A R. Wardhaugh Fridays
1:30 PM-3:30 PM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus

9805A - Writing History

This is a graduate course about the writing of history—the actual art and craft of writing historical nonfiction. It is not a seminar on research methods, historiography, or any particular subfield of history. It is a weekly writing workshop, in which we will all give and get criticism, working together to improve our writing skills. The work of the course consists of weekly writing assignments that we will share and critique in class, paying attention not only to questions of evidence and argument but also to issues like voice, pace, storytelling, and style. We will also read advice on academic and other writing, along with samples of effective prose. The purpose of the readings is to suggest strategies and techniques that we can apply to our own work, and to help us each think about how and maybe even why we want to write about the past.

Fall
2016-2017
9805A R. MacDougall Wednesdays
12:30 PM-3:30 PM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus

9806A - Understanding Archives: The Management of Primary Sources in the Digital Age

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of professional archival work. Class sessions will primarily be lecture driven, but combine discussion, practical exercises, and demonstrations. Students will gain a solid grounding in the history of the profession, an understanding of basic archival terminology, principles, theory, as well as an appreciation of current practices and how digital technologies have impacted both archival management and public programming. This course is designed for Public History students; open to other graduate students with the instructor’s permission.

Fall
2016-17
9806A D. Spanner Mondays
6:30 PM-9:30 PM
Stevenson Hall 3166
Syllabus to come.

9808A - Digital Public History

Digital history is the use of computers, digital media, and other tools for historical practice, presentation, analysis, and research. This course emphasizes both the presentation of history on the web, and the use of computational techniques to work with digital resources. Required for Public History students; open to other graduate students with the instructor's permission.

Digital history students may also be interested in the companion studio course, History 9832b: Interactive Exhibit Design, offered in the Winter Term.

Fall
2016-17
9808A Tim Compeau Thursdays
1:30 PM-4:30 PM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus to come.

9809A - Social Memory

This research course is an introduction to the phenomenon of social memory in various modern societies. It will address such matters as the commemoration of historical events and the meanings conferred on them, conflicts over different versions of history, the construction of collective identities around historical events, and the influence of historical events on modern nationalisms. In each case, there will be an attempt to understand the continuing impact of the past on the present. The seminar readings will be divided into themes, with each week’s readings examining a different case study of the theme.

Fall
2016-2017
9809A J. Vance Wednesdays
9:30 AM-11:30 AM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus

9877A - Digital Research Methods

Historical research now crucially involves the acquisition and use of digital sources. In this class, students will learn to find, harvest, manage, excerpt, cluster, and analyze digital materials throughout the research process, from initial exploratory forays through the production of an electronic article or monograph which is ready to submit for publication.

Fall
2016-2017
9877A W. Turkel

Tuesdays
6:30 PM-8:30 PM
Thursdays
6:30 PM-8:30 PM
Lawson Hall 2270C

Syllabus to come

Winter Term Courses (January-April 2017)

9207B - French Canada

This seminar explores the history of French Canada and the development of modern Quebec. The emphasis this term will be on the social, cultural, and political evolution of Quebec since the late nineteenth century. Our weekly discussions will focus on key themes such as the rise of Quebec nationalism in the early twentieth century, the province’s reaction to modernity, the changing role/function of the Church/religion, gender, the development of the modern bureaucratic state, as well as the Quiet Revolution and its aftermath. We will also devote considerable time discussing the major historiographical debates that have shaped both the writing of history as well as the modern Quebec mind.

Winter
2016-2017
9207B J. Vacante Tuesdays
1:30 PM-3:30 PM
Lawson Hall 1218
Syllabus

9308B - The United States and the Cold War

From the end of the Second World War until the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States’ conflict with the U.S.S.R. dominated American military and foreign policy, but it also permeated and shaped political, economic, social, and cultural life in the United States.  In this course, we will examine the role of the United States in the creation and waging of the Cold War, American responses to the Cold War, and the effects on American society of this nearly half century-long standoff between the two emerging superpowers. Rather than attempting a chronological study, we will select and focus on several key events and “battlegrounds” of this war--both actual and symbolic—and examine them through four different lenses:  military, diplomatic, ideological, and cultural.  We will also consider how the Cold War continues to shape American government and society today.

Winter
2016-2017
9308B A. Sendzikas Thursdays
9:30 AM-11:30 AM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus

9417B - Europe since the Second World War

This course on the history of Europe since World War II has a number of objectives. One is to provide a historical framework for the study of the period. A second objective is to introduce students to key subjects of historical inquiry. No claim is made for comprehensiveness. A third goal is to examine works of history that can serve as models of innovative formulations of questions and use of sources. The assigned readings include works by senior historians and recent PhDs, as well as works by non-historians, including academics from other disciplines, journalists, film directors, and writers of memoirs.

Winter
2016-2017
9417B E. Nathans Thursdays
1:30 PM-3:30 PM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus

9703B - The British Empire, 1875-1960

History 9703B considers the development of the British Empire from the time that "imperialism" emerged as an idea until British imperium disappeared suddenly, and unexpectedly in the fifteen years after World War Two. It is a reading course. While the legacies of earlier empires are considered, the focus is of this course remains on what have been called the "third" and "fourth" British Empires (Africa and the Middle East respectively) assembled, organised and dissolved in this period.

Winter
2016-2017
9703B B. Millman Tuesdays
9:30 AM-11:30 AM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus

9801B - Public History Group Project

This seminar course examines history as it is interpreted for and understood by the public including: public history theory (topics and issues such as authenticity, commemoration, "imagined communities", invention of tradition, "usable pasts", contested places, colonialism and culture, historical designation and preservation, living history, heritage tourism, cultural legislation, public policy, cultural (mis)representation, oral history, ethics, gender and class, the natural and built environment, intangible heritage, education vs. entertainment, and social memory); the history of public history (examination of the establishment of Canadian museums, archives, government agencies and the individuals key to their development); and, the practice of public history (through readings, guest speakers, site visits, workshops and projects, students learn the methods and skills practiced by public historians today). Required for Public History students; not open to other graduate students.

Winter
2016-2017
9801B M. Hamilton Tuesdays
11:30 AM-2:30 PM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus to come.

9807B - Introduction to Museology

This course is intended for students considering a career in the museum field, or, for those students interested in the history of museums and their associated roles as collector, steward and interpreter of public history. Museums are explored through both theoretical and applied contexts, with students acquiring an understanding of the objectives of effective museum management and the ability to directly apply these principles to the administration and operation of museums and cultural institutions. Topics explored include: the social history and development of museums; professional, legal and ethical standards; contemporary organizational & management structure, issues and strategies; and practical museum functions such as collections management, preservation, exhibition, and public education. This course is designed for Public History students; open to other graduate students with the instructor’s permission.

Winter
2016-2017
9807B Dr. Amber Lloydlangston Thursdays
6:30 PM-9:30 PM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus to come.

9819B - History and Theory: How to (Pretend You Can) Explain Everything that Ever Happened

This course is designed to introduce you to some of the philosophical and theoretical ideas that have shaped historical writing in the last century.  As historians seek to explain and interpret the meaning of the past, they take for granted that some things matter more than others, but they often disagree about what those things are: social hierarchy, cultural symbols, money, military power, violence, individuals or groups, identity, desire, difference, politics, governments, everyday people, spiritual and scientific claims to Truth. Understanding these debates, the advantages and disadvantages of these decisions and assumptions, will serve you both as an analytical reader of history (what assumptions does an author make? What will be invisible because of that?) and as a research historian (what assumptions am I making? Why? Should I adjust my approach? If I do, what new interpretations will become available?)

Winter
2016-2017
9819B L. Shire Wednesdays
1:30 PM-4:30 PM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus

9823B - Professional Development

A fundamental part of doing history is engaging with historical practice itself. This pass/fail course is designed to help History graduate students develop their understanding of our discipline’s professional expectations; think reflectively about their research, writing, and teaching; and develop skills that they can use to land and excel in a job in our profession. The course will involve group discussion, presentations, group work, workshops, and guest speakers. Required for 2nd year PhD students; may be audited by other graduate students with the instructor’s permission.

Winter
2016-2017
9823B A. MacEachern

Mon 1:30-3:30pm
Lawson Hall 2270C

Syllabus

9830B - Colonialism in the 19th and 20th Centuries

This course examines the history of modern era colonialism and its legacies in a comparative fashion. It utilizes case studies from various European colonial empires as well as Japan and the United States, draws on multi-disciplinary insights from fields such as history, sociology, geography, and anthropology, and explores the economic, military, social, cultural, intellectual, and environmental dimensions of colonialism.

Winter
2016-2017
9830B F. Schumacher Mondays
9:30 AM-11:30 AM
Lawson Hall 2270C
Syllabus

9832B - Interactive Exhibit Design

History 9832B is a studio course on interactive exhibit design, intended primarily for public historians and digital humanists. Students will learn how to create interactive exhibits through a series of hands-on projects that teach the basics of interaction design, physical computing, and desktop fabrication. Preference will be given to Public History students or graduate students in the digital humanities, but open to other graduate students with the instructor’s permission. Contact wturkel@uwo.ca for more information.

Winter
2016-2017
9832B W. Turkel Wednesdays
3:30 PM-6:30 PM
SSC 3116
Syllabus

Summer Term Courses (May-August 2017)

9900 - Cognate Paper

The cognate essay should be a high-quality research paper, comparable to an article published in a scholarly journal, which develops and sustains a significant historical argument. It must be:

  • approximately 12,500 words (about 50 typed, double-spaced pages) in length
  • characterized by polished presentation (well organized, clearly, concisely and elegantly expressed, free of grammar and syntax errors etc.)
  • based on primary source material, and
  • set in the context of the critical published work.