Jewish Studies Courses 2018-19

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ELIGIBLE JEWISH STUDIES COURSES 2018-19

* Note that some of the syllabi listed below are out of date!

Please refer to the time table above for the most accurate times/dates of courses in 2017-18

Eligible 1000 Level Courses

Hebrew 1030 - Hebrew 1

A course in oral and written modern Hebrew for students with rudimentary knowledge of the language. Prepares students for direct progression to Hebrew 2200 Hebrew 2.

Antirequisite(s): Grade 12 University-prepatory Hebrew, or equivalent level of secondary study.

Fall/Winter Huron College Ishai Tuesday/Thursday 8:30-10:30am
Fall/Winter Huron College Ishai Tuesday/Thursday 2:30-4:30pm

Hebrew 1040A- Introduction to Biblical Hebrew

An introduction to the writing system and grammar of Biblical Hebrew for those with no previous knowledge of the language. Special attention will be paid to the noun, adjective, and participle. 4 hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): Hebrew 1030 or Grade 4 Hebrew (or Grade 2 in Israel); the former Hebrew 003a/b.
 
Fall Huron College Meyer

Tuesday 12:30-2:30pm

Friday 11:30-1:30pm

Hebrew 1041B -  Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II

Continuation of Hebrew 1040A/B. An introduction to the grammar of Biblical Hebrew for those with little previous knowledge of the language. Special attention will be paid to forms of the verb.
Antirequisite(s): Hebrew 1030 or Grade 6 Hebrew (or Grade 3 in Israel); the former Hebrew 004a/b.
Prerequisite(s): Hebrew 1040A/B, the former Hebrew 003a/b, or permission of the Instructor.
Corequisite(s):
Pre-or Corequisite(s):
Extra Information: 4 hours, 0.5 course.
 
Winter Meyer Huron College

Tuesday/Friday 12:30-2:30

Eligible 2000 Level Courses

Religious Studies 2163B - An Eye For An Eye

How similar are biblical ideas of crime and punishment to our own? We cover topics like vengeance, blood feud, ordeal, and collective punishment alongside more familiar issues such as courtroom procedure, rules of evidence, and remedies for wrongful judgments. Do ancient, biblical approaches to crime and punishment remain relevant today?


Antirequisite(s): The former Religious Studies 3170F/G.

Fall Halberstam King's University College Thursday 3:30-5:30pm

Hebrew 2200 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew

This course provides students who already have a basic knowledge of grammatical structures with a more in-depth study of the language and attention to verb conjugation, noun forms, and syntactic structure of modern Hebrew. Students will learn to understand and produce texts in modern Hebrew through exposure to literature, poetry, and everyday conversation. 4 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): Hebrew 1030, or Grade 12 University-prepatory Hebrew or equivalent.

Fall/Winter Ishai Huron University College Tuesday/Thursday 11:30-1:30pm

Religious Studies 2204F - Western Religions: Judaism and Islam

This course provides a systematic introduction to the history, faith and tradition of Islam and Judaism. We will concentrate on the following topics: 1.What is the essence of Jewish and Islamic faith? 2. What is Islamic and Jewish theology? 3. What are the main stages of Jewish and Islamic thought and history? 4. Jewish and Islamic political models? 5. Islamic (Sufism) and Jewish mysticism (Kabbalah). 3 hours, 0.5.

Fall Hegedus King's University College Tuesday/Thursday 4:00-5:30pm

French 2211F - Holocaust and Literature

This course will examine descriptions of life during the Holocaust in a few essential testimonial texts, with a particular focus on the ways in which individuals react to extraordinary circumstances and interact with one another in a changed society. All readings and discussions in this course are in English. 2 hours, 0.5 course

Fall Goldschlager Main Campus Wednesday 3:30-5:30pm

Religious Studies 2347G - Living the Bible

Is it really possible to live according to biblical commandments? An exploration of biblical legal texts and early Jewish methods for transforming them into workable systems of law and ethics in the Mishnah and Talmuds. Focuses on questions of what makes legal interpretation valid and differentiating law from morality
Winter Halberstam Kings

Monday 2:30-3:30pm

Religious Studies 2420B - Intro to the Hebrew Bible

This course will introduce students to the texts of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, paying particular attention to the historical and cultural environment of the ancient Israelites. The course will cover major texts from the Torah, historical books, prophetic books, and wisdom literature.

Antirequisite(s): Biblical Studies 5120A/B, the former Religious Studies 2400F/G, the former Religious Studies 2410F/G.

Winter Lemos Huron Wednesday/Friday 9:30-10:30am

Philosophy 2665G- Intro Jewish Philosophy I

Topics include biblical and rabbinic texts as materials for philosophical exegesis -- the creation of the universe out of nothing, divine commands and moral requirements, freedom of the will, God's mysterious justice; Neoplatonism; Islamic influence on medieval Jewish thought; Maimonides and Jewish Aristotelianism; the Spanish conservative reaction; the Italian classical revival.

Winter Conter Huron

Monday 2:30-3:30pm

Wednesday 3:30-5:30

History 2822G - Jewish History from the Spanish Expulsion to the Modern Era

This course introduces students to the major events, figures, and themes of Jewish history from the Spanish Expulsion to the post-WWII era, including the Enlightenment and Emancipation, Zionism, the Holocaust, and the foundation of Israel.  

Antirequisites: The former History 2809E, the former History 3811E, the former History 2815E

2.0 hours, 0.5 course

Winter Main K. Priestman Tuesday 9:30-11:30pm


Eligible 3000 Level Courses

Religious Studies 3030G - Angry God: The Bible and War

Do Holy Scriptures promote bloodshed? This class will examine biblical conceptions of warfare and violence, as well as the ancient Near Eastern background for these conceptions. Topics will include holy war, genocide, body mutilation, apocalypticism, and later uses of biblical texts in political discourse.

Winter Lemos Huron Tuesday 1:30-4:30pm

History 3427E - The Holocaust

This course explores the evolution of the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question” in the broader context of German and Jewish history and anti-Semitic ideologies. The Holocaust is analyzed from the perspective of the perpetrators, victims and bystanders. The ultimate goal is to enable students to understand how and why the Holocaust happened. 3 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): The former History 394E if taken in 2006-07.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

This course counts as a History credit for the International Relations Program

Fall/Winter Main K. Priestman Monday 6:30-9:30pm

Religious Studies 3450G- Judaism and the Holocaust

The impact of the Holocaust (1938-45) on Judaism in terms of its philosophy-theology, subsequent placement in Western society, and on Western and Global society. Students will examine the historical-social context of anti-Semitism/National Socialism as well as investigating Jewish responses in theology, philosophy and socio-political identity after the Holocaust.

Winter Marks Huron Wednesday 3:30-6:30pm

* Please note * Religious Studies 4410F/G, Seminar in Sacred Scripture, offered at King's University College in the 2017-18 academic year, is eligible for credit towards the Jewish Studies Major and Minor.  It is considered a class in classical and modern Jewish thought for the purposes of satisfying the Jewish Studies distributional requirements

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