Required Courses - Major

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2.0 Courses from the following:

History 2606E - The Making of the Modern Middle East

This course moves from the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire through the formation of independent Turkey and the Arab and Jewish states to a consideration of social, economic and political developments such as the development of secular nationalism, socialism, pan-Islamism, and the challenges facing the modern Middle East. 3 lecture hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): History 2608F/G, the former History 2161E.

Religious Studies 2285F/G - Introductions to Islam

A study of Islam, its origin, main beliefs and practices; Islamic law, theology and mystical traditions; the diversity of modern Islam and its responses to the modern world. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Religious Studies 2286F/G - Introduction to Judaism

An exploration of the experiential dimension of the Jewish tradition through the lens of ritual studies. By exploring the festivals and observances that comprise a single Jewish year, we will delve into Judaism's conceptions of time, the body, food, suffering and love. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)


0.5 Course from the following:

Religious Studies 2345F/G - God, Guts and Glory: Biblical Storytelling

An examination of the heroes, villains, and miracle stories of the Hebrew Bible from their roots in the ancient Near East to their incorporation into early Judaism. Comparisons will be made to the role of these stories in early Christianity. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Antirequisite(s): Religious Studies 2325F/G

Religious Studies 2346F/G - Ancient Wisdom

What is wisdom, and how do we attain it?  Several books of the Bible are part of an ancient "wisdom tradition" which spanned from ancient Egypt to Babylon to ancient Israel.  What advice do these texts have, and what can they tell us about the well-lived life? 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Antirequisite(s): Religious Studies 2326F/G, 2410F/G, 2255F/G

Religious Studies 2500F/G - Introduction to the Qur'an

This course examines the Qur'an's form, content, and major themes to determine what they reveal about its nature, appeal, and significance. The ways in which the Qur'an has functioned as the primary authority and guide in Muslim history and contemporary life will be examined. 3 hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): Religious Studies 2310F/G


1.0 Course from the following:

Arabic 1030 - Arabic for Beginners

For students with no previous knowledge of Arabic, this course introduces spoken and written Modern Standard Arabic with emphasis on the development of communicative skills. Prepares students for progression directly to Arabic 2250.4 hours, 1.0 course.

Antirequisite(s): Grade 12U Arabic and Arabic 1035.

Arabic 2250 - Intermediate Arabic

This course is designed to build upon skills in reading and speaking Arabic developed in earlier courses. Students will gain increased vocabulary and a greater understanding of more complex grammatical structures. They will be able to approach prose, fiction, and non-fiction written in the language. 4 hours, 1.0 course.

Prerequisite(s): Arabic 1030 or Grade 12U Arabic or the former Arabic 002, International and Comparative Studies 008, or permission of the Department

Arabic 3300-Advanced Arabic

Advanced grammar and composition along with reading of selected texts from the rich heritage of literature written in Arabic. 4 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): Arabic 2250 or the former International and Comparative Studies 028, Arabic 020, or permission of the Department.

Hebrew 1030 - Hebrew

An introduction to oral and written modern Hebrew for students with little or no previous knowledge of the language. Prepares students for direct progression to Hebrew 2200 Hebrew 2. 4 hours, 1.0 course (Huron)

Antirequisite(s): Grade 12 Hebrew, or equivalent level of secondary study.

Hebrew 1040A/B - Introduction to Biblical Hebrew

An introduction to the writing system and grammar of Biblical Hebrew for those with no previous knowledge of the language. Special attention will be paid to the noun, adjective, and participle. 4 hours, 0.5 course (Huron)

Antirequisite(s): Hebrew 1030 or Grade 4 Hebrew (or Grade 2 in Israel); the former Hebrew 003a/b.

Hebrew 1041A/B - Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II

Continuation of Hebrew 1040A/B. An introduction to the grammar of Biblical Hebrew for those with little previous knowledge of the language. Special attention will be paid to forms of the verb. 4 hours, 0.5 course (Huron)

Antirequisite(s): Hebrew 1030 or Grade 6 Hebrew (or Grade 3 in Israel); the former Hebrew 004a/b.
Prerequisite(s): Hebrew 1040A/B, the former Hebrew 003a/b, or permission of the Instructor.

Hebrew 2200 - Hebrew 2

This course is designed to build upon skills in reading and speaking modern Hebrew, developed in earlier courses. Students will gain increased vocabulary, and a greater understanding of more complex grammatical structures. 4 hours, 1.0 course (Huron)

Antirequisite(s): The former Hebrew 025.
Prerequisite(s): Hebrew 1030 or the former Hebrew 005, or Grade 12U Hebrew or equivalent.

Hebrew 2240A/B - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew: Prose

Reading, translating, and analyzing the grammar of selected prose passages from the Hebrew Bible with the aid of a lexicon. 4 hours, 0.5 course (Huron)

Antirequisite(s): The former Hebrew 020, Hebrew 021a/b, Grade 7 Hebrew (or Grade 4 in Israel).
Prerequisite(s): Hebrew 1041A/B or the former Hebrew 004a/b or Grade 6 Hebrew (Grade 3 in Israel), or permission of the instructor.

Hebrew 2241A/B - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew: Poetry

Reading, translating, and analyzing the grammar of selected passages of poetry from the Hebrew Bible with the aid of a lexicon. 4 hours, 0.5 course (Huron)

Antirequisite(s): The former Hebrew 020, Hebrew 022a/b, Grade 7 Hebrew (or Grade 4 in Israel).
Prerequisite(s): Hebrew 1041A/B or the former Hebrew 004a/b or Grade 6 Hebrew (or Grade 3 in Israel), or permission of the instructor.


2.0 Courses from the following:

1.0 course each from any two of the following three areas:

1) Religion and Philosophy:

Philosophy 2665F/G - Introduction to Jewish Philosophy 1: From the Beginnings to the Italian Renaissance

Topics include biblical and rabbinic texts as materials for philosophical exegesis -- the creation of the universe out of nothing, divine commands and moral requirements, freedom of the will, God's mysterious justice; Neoplatonism; Islamic influence on medieval Jewish thought; Maimonides and Jewish Aristotelianism; the Spanish conservative reaction; the Italian classical revival.

Antirequisite(s): The former Philosophy 214 F/G.

Philosophy 2667F/G - Introduction to Jewish Philosophy 2: Early Modern to Contemporary

Topics include: Spinoza and the critique of traditional religion; Judaism and the Enlightenment; historical scholarship and reform; the reassertion of tradition; Jewish speculative philosophy of history; other faiths; rationalism; evil, suffering, and the Holocaust; issues of inclusion -- the role of women; Zionism; rationality and belief at the present time.

Philosophy 2668F/G - Introduction to Islamic Thought

This course provides a systematic introduction to the major themes of Islamic thought, and will address in particular the following questions:(l) What is Islamic thought and philosophy?; (2)Can the main statements of Islam be justified by reason?; (3) How did Ancient Greek ideas influence Islam?; and (4) What is Islamic Mysticism? 3 hours,0.5 course

Philosophy 4674F/G - Comparative Jewish, Islamic and Christian Thought

A discussion of various issues and figures common to all three monotheistic traditions. Students may cover questions concerning the nature of God, belief, the law, mysticism, as well as the immortality of the soul. 3 hours, 0.5 course (King's)

Prerequisite(s): 3rd or 4th year standing in a Philosophy program, or Jewish Studies.

Philosophy 4675F/G - Special Topics in Islamic Philosophy

An investigation of selected issues and thinkers in medieval and modern Islamic thought. Topics may include: the definition of Islam (e.g., mainline versus sects), the relationship between politics and Islam, various understandings of Jihad, and the nature of divine attributes. 3 hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 3rd or 4th year standing in a Philosophy program

Philosophy 4676F/G - Introduction to Jewish Philosophy 2: Early Modern to Contemporary

A comparison of Jewish kabbalah and Islamic Sufi mysticism. Questions to be discussed: Can the soul be united with God? How to decode the secrets of creation? What is the relationship between love and God? Students may read Al-Ghazali, Isaac Israeli, Rumi and Suhrawardi. 3 hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 3rd or 4th year standing in a Philosophy program, or Jewish Studies

Religious Studies 2114A/B - Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls

Surveys of the Dead Sea Scrolls in translation, providing introduction to types of literature, archaeological contexts, and history of interpretation of the Scrolls over the past half century. Special attention will be paid to the religious beliefs of the Qumran community within the diverse Judaism of the Second Temple Period. 2 hours, 0.5 course (Huron)

Religious Studies 2204F/G - World Religions: Judaism and Islam

A study of the history, faith and practices of Judaism and Islam. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Antirequisite(s): Religious Studies 2130

Religious Studies 2213F/G - Prophecy

Can we predict the future? Are we warned about cataclysmic events? An examination of the role of prophets in the Hebrew Bible—their historical context, social roles, and powerful writings—and the implications for whether prophecy might still be alive today. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Antirequisite(s): Religious Studies 2410F/G

Religious Studies 2262F/G - Topics in Islam

Please consult department for current offerings. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Religious Studies 2347F/G - Living the Bible: Law and Ethics

Is it really possible to live according to biblical commandments?  An exploration of biblical legal texts and early Jewish methods for transforming them into workable systems of law and ethics in the Mishnah and Talmuds.  Focuses on questions of what makes legal interpretation valid and differentiating law from morality. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Antirequisite(s): Religious Studies 2327F/G

Religious Studies 2501F/G - Islam Today

This course examines the diversity of Muslim experiences in the contemporary world.Using a wide selection of source material (memoirs, art and architecture, religious and literary texts) the varieties of world-views, challenges, limitations, opportunities and methodologies informing Islamic societies worldwide and in Canada will be examined. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Religious Studies 2503F/G - Introduction to Islamic Mysticism

This course focuses on the diverse aspects of mystical teachings in Islam (Sufism) with frequent comparative reference to Christian and Ancient mysticism. A variety of mystical traditions (ecstatic, contemplative, magical, and philosophical) will be discussed and analyzed based on translated primary sources. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Religious Studies 2219A/B - Christianity and Islam in Conversation

This course introduces the foundational beliefs and practices of two of the monotheistic religions, Christianity and Islam, as a basis for understanding, conversation and dialogue. Small group work, visits to representative religious sites, class presentations and guest speakers. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Brescia)

Antirequisite(s): The former Religious Studies 191F/G Special Topics Christianity and Islam in Conversation, offered in 2002-03, 2004-05, 2005-06

2) History and Politics:

History 2607F/G - The History and Civilization of Modern Islam

The course introduces the main events and themes of Islamic history and civilization and their place in world history. Topics include: Muhammad and the Qur'an, the Islamic legal system, social structure and political institutions, literature, philosophy, theology, art and architecture, medicine and science, interaction with Europe, the Crusades, and trade. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course

History 2809E - Jewish History and Culture to 1492

This course will survey the religious, social, economic and cultural development of Judaism and Jewish life, and relationships between Jews and other communities. 3 lecture hours, 1.0 course

History 3605E - Crusaders and Moslems in the Twelfth Century

TAspects of Frankish and Moslem Societies and Cultures in the Middle East. 2 lecture hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

History 3691E -Selected Topics in Asian, African or Middle Eastern History: Revolutions in the 20th Century Middle East

To develop students' understanding of the dynamics of political change in the 20th century Middle East, through a study of coups, revolutionary and social/political movements, and the authoritarian and/or the revolutionary regimes that they confronted or brought to power. 2 lecture hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Political Science 3328F/G: Political Development in the Muslim World

This half-course in comparative politics introduces the Muslim world through a few select case studies of Muslim majority countries of Asia and Africa, and explores the challenges, difficulties and problems of "old societies and new states" making transition to democracy and meeting the demands of globalization. 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2245E

Political Science 3329F/G - The Politics of the Middle East

This half-course in comparative politics introduces the Middle East in world politics and explores the issues relating to political and economic development, war and peace in the region through the second-half of the twentieth century to present times.

Antirequisite(s): The former Political Science 2243E (Main Campus), the former Political Science 2143E (King's College), and Political Science 2243E (King's College)
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E, 2245E, or International Relations 2701E.

Political Science 4409F/G - The United States and the Middle East

The course explores the complex relationship between the United States and the Middle East, particularly since the establishment of Israel and the making of new states in the region. It will focus primarily on how the United States views and came to occupy a defining role in the region's politics.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701 and Political Science 2244E.

Political Science 4443E - Foreign Policies of Middle Eastern States

This course will examine the foreign policies of the Arab states in the Middle East, Turkey, Israel and Iran. It will consider a framework for analysis that takes into account the major conceptual contributions of recent decades. 2 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or 2243E.

3) Literature and Culture:

Anthropology 2219F/G - Cultures of the Middle East

A critical examination of approaches that tend to homogenize and dehistoricize Middle Eastern peoples. The course provides an historical overview that reveals regional heterogeneity, and shifts in peoples, powers and borders. Due to the immensity and complexity of the region, the thematic focus will change regularly. 3 hours, 0.5 course.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Arabic 2250 - Intermediate Arabic

This course is designed to build upon skills in reading and speaking Arabic developed in earlier courses. Students will gain increased vocabulary and a greater understanding of more complex grammatical structures. They will be able to approach prose, fiction, and non-fiction written in the language. 4 hours, 1.0 course.

Prerequisite(s): Arabic 1030 or Grade 12U Arabic or the former Arabic 002, International and Comparative Studies 008, or permission of the Department

Arabic 3300-Advanced Arabic

Advanced grammar and composition along with reading of selected texts from the rich heritage of literature written in Arabic. 4 hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): Arabic 2250 or the former International and Comparative Studies 028, Arabic 020, or permission of the Department.

Centre for Global Studies 2340F/G - Mapping the Middle East

The complexity of the region is addressed by studying a series of mapping techniques: of the Ottoman and Persian Empires; of the economic concessions (from 1550); the dislocation of culture and religion; and the legacy of this history for the Treaty of Versailles (1919) to the present day.

Antirequisite(s): The former International and Comparative Studies 190F/G and 291F/G if taken in 2001-2007.

Centre for Global Studies 2341F/G- Perceptions of the Middle East

The purpose of “Perceptions of the Middle East” is to understand the constructions which continue to prevail in the region and to understand the contemporary situation using the study of imperialism, “Orientalism”, nationalism, globalization, and religion.

Antirequisite(s): The former International and Comparative Studies 191F/G and 292F/G if taken in 2001-2007.

Film Studies 2251E - World Cinema

This course provides an introduction to important topics of global film history with a focus on film cultures in Africa; Latin America; Asia; the Middle East, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Students will examine the social, economic, and cultural contexts and broader patterns of influence in the global cultural economy. 5 hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): The former Film Studies 151E.
Prerequisite(s): At least 60% in Film Studies 1020E or permission of the Department.

Religious Studies 2502F/G - Gender in Islam

This course explores Islam's social, institutional, doctrinal, and historical expressions through the prism of gender. How gender is textually defined and socially enacted in and through the foundational discourses of Islam, as well as Women's assertion of power through mystical experiences rituals, prayer, and oral/textual transmission of knowledge will be explored. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Antirequisite(s): Religious Studies 2291F taken in 2009-10.

Religious Studies 2504F/G - Islam at the Cinema

This course examines depictions of Islam and Muslims in films produced by both Muslims and non-Muslims. Using cinema as a mediator of religious thoughts, values, assumptions, and struggles, the primary goal of this course is to understand the efficacy of cinema in creating, reflecting, negotiating, resisting, or embracing basic Islamic assumptions. 3 hours, 1-2 hours screening, 0.5 course (Kings)

Hebrew 2200 - Hebrew 2

This course is designed to build upon skills in reading and speaking modern Hebrew, developed in earlier courses. Students will gain increased vocabulary, and a greater understanding of more complex grammatical structures. 4 hours, 1.0 course (Huron)

Antirequisite(s): The former Hebrew 025.
Prerequisite(s): Hebrew 1030 or the former Hebrew 005, or Grade 12U Hebrew or equivalent.

Hebrew 2240A/B - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew: Prose

Reading, translating, and analyzing the grammar of selected prose passages from the Hebrew Bible with the aid of a lexicon. 4 hours, 0.5 course (Huron)

Antirequisite(s): The former Hebrew 020, Hebrew 021a/b, Grade 7 Hebrew (or Grade 4 in Israel).
Prerequisite(s): Hebrew 1041A/B or the former Hebrew 004a/b or Grade 6 Hebrew (Grade 3 in Israel), or permission of the instructor.

Hebrew 2241A/B - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew: Poetry

Reading, translating, and analyzing the grammar of selected passages of poetry from the Hebrew Bible with the aid of a lexicon. 4 hours, 0.5 course (Huron)

Antirequisite(s): The former Hebrew 020, Hebrew 022a/b, Grade 7 Hebrew (or Grade 4 in Israel).
Prerequisite(s): Hebrew 1041A/B or the former Hebrew 004a/b or Grade 6 Hebrew (or Grade 3 in Israel), or permission of the instructor.

1.5 Courses from any of the following not taken above:

Philosophy 2665F/G - Introduction to Jewish Philosophy 1: From the Beginnings to the Italian Renaissance

Topics include biblical and rabbinic texts as materials for philosophical exegesis -- the creation of the universe out of nothing, divine commands and moral requirements, freedom of the will, God's mysterious justice; Neoplatonism; Islamic influence on medieval Jewish thought; Maimonides and Jewish Aristotelianism; the Spanish conservative reaction; the Italian classical revival.

Antirequisite(s): The former Philosophy 214 F/G.

Philosophy 2667F/G - Introduction to Jewish Philosophy 2: Early Modern to Contemporary

Topics include: Spinoza and the critique of traditional religion; Judaism and the Enlightenment; historical scholarship and reform; the reassertion of tradition; Jewish speculative philosophy of history; other faiths; rationalism; evil, suffering, and the Holocaust; issues of inclusion -- the role of women; Zionism; rationality and belief at the present time.

Philosophy 2668F/G - Introduction to Islamic Thought

This course provides a systematic introduction to the major themes of Islamic thought, and will address in particular the following questions:(l) What is Islamic thought and philosophy?; (2)Can the main statements of Islam be justified by reason?; (3) How did Ancient Greek ideas influence Islam?; and (4) What is Islamic Mysticism? 3 hours,0.5 course

Philosophy 4674F/G - Comparative Jewish, Islamic and Christian Thought

A discussion of various issues and figures common to all three monotheistic traditions. Students may cover questions concerning the nature of God, belief, the law, mysticism, as well as the immortality of the soul. 3 hours, 0.5 course (King's)

Prerequisite(s): 3rd or 4th year standing in a Philosophy program, or Jewish Studies.

Philosophy 4675F/G - Special Topics in Islamic Philosophy

An investigation of selected issues and thinkers in medieval and modern Islamic thought. Topics may include: the definition of Islam (e.g., mainline versus sects), the relationship between politics and Islam, various understandings of Jihad, and the nature of divine attributes. 3 hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 3rd or 4th year standing in a Philosophy program

Philosophy 4676F/G - Introduction to Jewish Philosophy 2: Early Modern to Contemporary

A comparison of Jewish kabbalah and Islamic Sufi mysticism. Questions to be discussed: Can the soul be united with God? How to decode the secrets of creation? What is the relationship between love and God? Students may read Al-Ghazali, Isaac Israeli, Rumi and Suhrawardi. 3 hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 3rd or 4th year standing in a Philosophy program, or Jewish Studies

Religious Studies 2114A/B - Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls

Surveys of the Dead Sea Scrolls in translation, providing introduction to types of literature, archaeological contexts, and history of interpretation of the Scrolls over the past half century. Special attention will be paid to the religious beliefs of the Qumran community within the diverse Judaism of the Second Temple Period. 2 hours, 0.5 course (Huron)

Religious Studies 2204F/G - World Religions: Judaism and Islam

A study of the history, faith and practices of Judaism and Islam. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Antirequisite(s): Religious Studies 2130

Religious Studies 2213F/G - Prophecy

Can we predict the future? Are we warned about cataclysmic events? An examination of the role of prophets in the Hebrew Bible—their historical context, social roles, and powerful writings—and the implications for whether prophecy might still be alive today. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Antirequisite(s): Religious Studies 2410F/G

Religious Studies 2262F/G - Topics in Islam

Please consult department for current offerings. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Religious Studies 2347F/G - Living the Bible: Law and Ethics

Is it really possible to live according to biblical commandments?  An exploration of biblical legal texts and early Jewish methods for transforming them into workable systems of law and ethics in the Mishnah and Talmuds.  Focuses on questions of what makes legal interpretation valid and differentiating law from morality. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Antirequisite(s): Religious Studies 2327F/G

Religious Studies 2501F/G - Islam Today

This course examines the diversity of Muslim experiences in the contemporary world.Using a wide selection of source material (memoirs, art and architecture, religious and literary texts) the varieties of world-views, challenges, limitations, opportunities and methodologies informing Islamic societies worldwide and in Canada will be examined. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Religious Studies 2502F/G - Gender in Islam

This course explores Islam's social, institutional, doctrinal, and historical expressions through the prism of gender. How gender is textually defined and socially enacted in and through the foundational discourses of Islam, as well as Women's assertion of power through mystical experiences rituals, prayer, and oral/textual transmission of knowledge will be explored. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Antirequisite(s): Religious Studies 2291F taken in 2009-10.

Religious Studies 2503F/G - Introduction to Islamic Mysticism

This course focuses on the diverse aspects of mystical teachings in Islam (Sufism) with frequent comparative reference to Christian and Ancient mysticism. A variety of mystical traditions (ecstatic, contemplative, magical, and philosophical) will be discussed and analyzed based on translated primary sources. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Kings)

Religious Studies 2219A/B - Christianity and Islam in Conversation

This course introduces the foundational beliefs and practices of two of the monotheistic religions, Christianity and Islam, as a basis for understanding, conversation and dialogue. Small group work, visits to representative religious sites, class presentations and guest speakers. 3 hours, 0.5 course (Brescia)

Antirequisite(s): The former Religious Studies 191F/G Special Topics Christianity and Islam in Conversation, offered in 2002-03, 2004-05, 2005-06

Religious Studies 2504F/G - Islam at the Cinema

This course examines depictions of Islam and Muslims in films produced by both Muslims and non-Muslims. Using cinema as a mediator of religious thoughts, values, assumptions, and struggles, the primary goal of this course is to understand the efficacy of cinema in creating, reflecting, negotiating, resisting, or embracing basic Islamic assumptions. 3 hours, 1-2 hours screening, 0.5 course (Kings)

History 2607F/G - The History and Civilization of Modern Islam

The course introduces the main events and themes of Islamic history and civilization and their place in world history. Topics include: Muhammad and the Qur'an, the Islamic legal system, social structure and political institutions, literature, philosophy, theology, art and architecture, medicine and science, interaction with Europe, the Crusades, and trade. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course

History 2608F/G- The History of the Modern Middle East

The course surveys the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire, the transformation of political institutions, the formation of independent Arab states in the 20th century, Arab nationalism, fundamentalism, the impact of European and American imperialism, and the challenges of modernity for the family and status of women.  3 lecture hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 2606E and the former History 2161.

History 2809E - Jewish History and Culture to 1492

This course will survey the religious, social, economic and cultural development of Judaism and Jewish life, and relationships between Jews and other communities. 3 lecture hours, 1.0 course

History 3605E - Crusaders and Moslems in the Twelfth Century

TAspects of Frankish and Moslem Societies and Cultures in the Middle East. 2 lecture hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

History 3691E -Selected Topics in Asian, African or Middle Eastern History: Revolutions in the 20th Century Middle East

To develop students' understanding of the dynamics of political change in the 20th century Middle East, through a study of coups, revolutionary and social/political movements, and the authoritarian and/or the revolutionary regimes that they confronted or brought to power. 2 lecture hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Political Science 3328F/G: Political Development in the Muslim World

This half-course in comparative politics introduces the Muslim world through a few select case studies of Muslim majority countries of Asia and Africa, and explores the challenges, difficulties and problems of "old societies and new states" making transition to democracy and meeting the demands of globalization. 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2245E

Political Science 3329F/G - The Politics of the Middle East

This half-course in comparative politics introduces the Middle East in world politics and explores the issues relating to political and economic development, war and peace in the region through the second-half of the twentieth century to present times.

Antirequisite(s): The former Political Science 2243E (Main Campus), the former Political Science 2143E (King's College), and Political Science 2243E (King's College)
Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E, 2245E, or International Relations 2701E.

Political Science 4409F/G - The United States and the Middle East

The course explores the complex relationship between the United States and the Middle East, particularly since the establishment of Israel and the making of new states in the region. It will focus primarily on how the United States views and came to occupy a defining role in the region's politics.

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or International Relations 2701 and Political Science 2244E.

Political Science 4443E - Foreign Policies of Middle Eastern States

This course will examine the foreign policies of the Arab states in the Middle East, Turkey, Israel and Iran. It will consider a framework for analysis that takes into account the major conceptual contributions of recent decades. 2 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): Political Science 2231E or 2243E.

Anthropology 2219F/G - Cultures of the Middle East

A critical examination of approaches that tend to homogenize and dehistoricize Middle Eastern peoples. The course provides an historical overview that reveals regional heterogeneity, and shifts in peoples, powers and borders. Due to the immensity and complexity of the region, the thematic focus will change regularly. 3 hours, 0.5 course.

Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

Arabic 2250 - Intermediate Arabic

This course is designed to build upon skills in reading and speaking Arabic developed in earlier courses. Students will gain increased vocabulary and a greater understanding of more complex grammatical structures. They will be able to approach prose, fiction, and non-fiction written in the language. 4 hours, 1.0 course.

Prerequisite(s): Arabic 1030 or Grade 12U Arabic or the former Arabic 002, International and Comparative Studies 008, or permission of the Department

Centre for Global Studies 2340F/G - Mapping the Middle East

The complexity of the region is addressed by studying a series of mapping techniques: of the Ottoman and Persian Empires; of the economic concessions (from 1550); the dislocation of culture and religion; and the legacy of this history for the Treaty of Versailles (1919) to the present day.

Antirequisite(s): The former International and Comparative Studies 190F/G and 291F/G if taken in 2001-2007.

Centre for Global Studies 2341F/G- Perceptions of the Middle East

The purpose of “Perceptions of the Middle East” is to understand the constructions which continue to prevail in the region and to understand the contemporary situation using the study of imperialism, “Orientalism”, nationalism, globalization, and religion.

Antirequisite(s): The former International and Comparative Studies 191F/G and 292F/G if taken in 2001-2007.

Film Studies 2251E - World Cinema

This course provides an introduction to important topics of global film history with a focus on film cultures in Africa; Latin America; Asia; the Middle East, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Students will examine the social, economic, and cultural contexts and broader patterns of influence in the global cultural economy. 5 hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): The former Film Studies 151E.
Prerequisite(s): At least 60% in Film Studies 1020E or permission of the Department.

Hebrew 2200 - Hebrew 2

This course is designed to build upon skills in reading and speaking modern Hebrew, developed in earlier courses. Students will gain increased vocabulary, and a greater understanding of more complex grammatical structures. 4 hours, 1.0 course (Huron)

Antirequisite(s): The former Hebrew 025.
Prerequisite(s): Hebrew 1030 or the former Hebrew 005, or Grade 12U Hebrew or equivalent.

Hebrew 2240A/B - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew: Prose

Reading, translating, and analyzing the grammar of selected prose passages from the Hebrew Bible with the aid of a lexicon. 4 hours, 0.5 course (Huron)

Antirequisite(s): The former Hebrew 020, Hebrew 021a/b, Grade 7 Hebrew (or Grade 4 in Israel).
Prerequisite(s): Hebrew 1041A/B or the former Hebrew 004a/b or Grade 6 Hebrew (Grade 3 in Israel), or permission of the instructor.

Hebrew 2241A/B - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew: Poetry

Reading, translating, and analyzing the grammar of selected passages of poetry from the Hebrew Bible with the aid of a lexicon. 4 hours, 0.5 course (Huron)

Antirequisite(s): The former Hebrew 020, Hebrew 022a/b, Grade 7 Hebrew (or Grade 4 in Israel).
Prerequisite(s): Hebrew 1041A/B or the former Hebrew 004a/b or Grade 6 Hebrew (or Grade 3 in Israel), or permission of the instructor.

At least 1.0 of the courses taken to fulfill the options in Religion and Philosophy, History and Politics or Literature and Culture must be at the 3000 level or above**
Note: Some courses in this module may require prerequisites; students are advised to check course prerequisites carefully.
* Any 2000 level course or above taken in Arabic or Hebrew beyond the 1.0 required to fulfill the Language category may be used to fulfill the Literature and Culture requirement
** The History Department will maintain a list of special topics courses that can fulfill the requirements for this module.

Rules Governing Course Overlaps for the Middle East Studies Major
Upon request a maximum of 1.0 course credit may be allowed towards fulfilling the requirements of the Middle East Studies Major for courses taken at the 2000 level or above, if the course is eligible for credit under the rules of the Middle East Studies Major, even if the course has been credited towards a different module. Please note that this does not lower the total number of courses needed to meet graduation requirements..