3000 Level Courses

2021-22 Academic Year

Draft course outlines will be made available on or before June 2, 2021.  Please visit your course OWL site for final course outlines. 

3206F - Identities in Conflict: Canadian Social History Since 1800

This course examines the social history of Canada since 1800. Focusing on the lives of everyday people and utilizing issues of gender, race, class, and sexuality, this course explores topics related to industrialization, urbanization, immigration, family, crime, and social reform. Considerable attention is paid to the historiography/methodologies of the field.

Syllabus
Professor: M. Halpern
Term: Fall
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above
Anitrequisite(s): 
History 3205E
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

3208G - Life, Love & Death In Early Canada 

This course explores everyday life in Canada between 1760 and 1914. Topics include birth, family and home, dress and etiquette, love and marriage, food, health, morality, death and mourning. Analytical themes include race, class, gender, social memory and identity.

Syllabus
Professor: M. Hamilton
Term: Winter
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above.
Anitrequisite(s): History 4213F/G, History 4496F if taken in 2011.
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

3310F - Advanced American Studies: Being American

What defines being “American”?  How is the American identity constructed, and how and why is it frequently contested?  This course employs an interdisciplinary approach to explore the meaning(s) and definition(s) of American identity from multiple viewpoints, and within the context of US history, politics, regions, values, and culture. 

Syllabus
Professor: A. Sendzikas
Term: Fall
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above OR enrolment in an American Studies module
Anitrequisite(s):  American Studies 3310F/G
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

3404F - Montesquieu to Mill: Classic Texts and Debates in Western Culture (II)

The class examines and compares the work of key Enlightenment thinkers, including Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Rousseau, as well as authors who responded to the Enlightenment and the French Revolution and interpreted contemporary changes taking place in Europe, including Edmund Burke, Friedrich Hegel, Alexis de Tocqueville, and John Stuart Mill.

Syllabus
Professor: E. Nathans
Term: Fall
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course
Pre-1800 History Course
International Relations Approved


3412F - Britain's Sailors, Soldiers, and Empire: 1689-1902

This course examines the emergence of Britain as an imperial power in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and the military means by which that empire was acquired (and lost). It explores both soldiers' and sailors' lives and the effects of war on state formation and national identity within Britain.

Syllabus
Professor: A. May
Term: Fall
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 seminar hour, 0.5 course
Pre-1800 History Course
International Relations Approved

3414G - The Victorian Worldview: Nineteenth-Century Britain

This seminar examines the worldviews of men and women in nineteenth-century Britain: economic, political, social, and scientific, taking into account both conservative and radical perspectives. It also explores the domestic ideology commonly associated with the period, and the challenges posed to the Victorian domestic ideal.
Syllabus
Professor: A. May
Term: Winter
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above
Anitrequisite(s): History 3432F/G, History 4423E, History 4420F/G
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course
Pre-1800 History Course
International Relations Approved

3428F - Modern Germany, 1871 To The Present 

Germany was arguably the dominant state in continental Europe from its founding until 1945. Since reunification it has again begun to play this role. Its achievements and its crimes cast long shadows on all its neighbors. We examine all aspects of this history, including domestic politics, social divisions, and culture.

Syllabus
Professor: E. Nathans
Term: Fall
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above
Anitrequisite(s): The former History 3415E
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course
International Relations Approved

3605E - Crusaders & Moslems in the Twelfth Century

Aspects of Frankish and Moslem Societies and Cultures in the Middle East.

Syllabus
Professor: M. Shatzmiller
Term: Fall/Winter
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above
Anitrequisite(s): History 3602F/G
Extra Information: 2 hours, 1.0 course
Pre-1800 History Course
International Relations Approved

3616G - Grand Imperialism: The Asia-Pacific In The Long 19th Century 

An investigation of historical developments within the international system in the Asia-Pacific and the region’s interactions with the wider world and how the interplay of political, economic, and cultural factors affected the developments in empire, conflict and diplomacy from the late 18th century to 1910.

Syllabus
Professor: C. Young
Term: Winter
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above
Anitrequisite(s): The former History 3611E
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours, 0.5 course
International Relations Approved

3808G - Jewish Life In North America Since 1880

This course examines the history of Jews in the United States and Canada, highlighting their changing family, spiritual, social, and work lives, exploring themes of identity, assimilation, activism, and upward mobility, and considering how Jews have helped shape North American life through their struggles and achievements.

Syllabus
Professor: M. Halpern
Term: Winter
Course Delivery: Online synchronous 
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

3813E - Public History

An exploration of history as it is understood by and interpreted for the public in varied venues and media, including museums, historic sites, historical fiction, the internet, and film. Topics include the history of public history, ethical practice, the relationships between form and content and between public and academic history.

Syllabus
Professor: M. Dove
Term: Fall/Winter
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above; or History 2811F/G and enrolment in the Minor in Public History
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours, 1.0 course

3814F - Kicking & Screaming: Women's Protest Movements in 19th & 20th Century Canada & the United States

This course will focus on female protest movements whose primary goal was to better the lives of women. With attention to issues of gender, sexuality, race, and class, it will explore various conditions that gave rise to rebellion, and will assess the movements' strategies and achievements.

Syllabus
Professor: M. Halpern
Term: Fall
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above
Anitrequisite(s): History 2813F/G 
Extra Information: 3 hours, 0.5 course

3823G - Global Twenty-First Century History

A thematic introduction to 21st-century history focused on phenomena that characterize our age: the global connectivity of supply chains, planetary-scale computation, the War on Terror, and unprecedented ecological change. Contemporary events are contextualized in an interdisciplinary fashion at time scales ranging from days to millions of years.

Syllabus
Professor: W. Turkel
Term: Winter
Course Delivery: In-person 
Prerequisite(s): Any 0.5 or 1.0 essay course
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course
International Relations Approved