3000 Level Courses

2020-21 Academic Year

Draft course outlines will be made available on or before June 2nd 2020.  Please visit your course OWL site for final course outlines. 

3206G - Identities in Conflict: Canadian Social History Since 1800

This course examines the social history of Canada since 1800. Focusing on the lives of everyday people and utilizing issues of gender, race, class, and sexuality, this course explores topics related to industrialization, urbanization, immigration, family, crime, and social reform. Considerable attention is paid to the historiography/methodologies of the field.
2 seminar hours/

Antirequisite(s): History 3205E
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.
Winter This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. M. Halpern Wednesday 2:30-4:30pm

Syllabus

3226F - Canadian Political Leadership

This course focuses on leadership styles of the most influential, innovative, and frequently controversial prime ministers and provincial premiers from the 1860s to the present. Emphasis is placed on the interplay of character, circumstance, pragmatism and principle in governing a nation as ethnically diverse and regionally fragmented as Canada. 
2 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3297F/G taken in 2009 and 2010.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.
Fall This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. K.Fleming Wednesday 6:30-8:30pm

Syllabus

3310G - Advanced American Studies: Being American

What defines being “American”?  How is the American identity constructed, and how and why is it frequently contested?  This course employs an interdisciplinary approach to explore the meaning(s) and definition(s) of American identity from multiple viewpoints, and within the context of US history, politics, regions, values, and culture. 
2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): American Studies 3310F/G
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above OR enrolment in an American Studies module.

Winter This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. A. Sendzikas Tuesday 3:30-5:30pm

Syllabus

3320E - Global America: The United States in World Affairs, 1700 to the Present

Throughout its history the United States has imagined itself as a global project. To better understand America's role in the world and the impact of international developments on the United States, this seminar explores the political, economic, military, and cultural dimensions of U.S. interaction with the world since the 18th century.
2 hours, 1.0 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3319E
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2300, 3300 or 4300 level or enrolment in the Honors Specialization in International Relations.
  • International Relations Approved
Fall/Winter This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. F. Schumacher Friday 9:30-11:30am Syllabus

3326F - Atomic America: The United States During the 1950s

This seminar examines some key aspects of political, social, and cultural life in the United States during the 1950s. Topics include social classes, urban and suburban growth, family and gender relations, McCarthyism, and civil rights movements. The impact and legacy of events and issues of the 1950s are evaluated.
3 hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisite(s): History 3396F/G if taken in 2011-2012
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above.

  • International Relations Approved
Fall This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. A. Sendzikas Thursday 1:30-4:30pm Syllabus

3412F - Britain's Sailors, Soldiers, and Empire: 1689-1902

This course examines the emergence of Britain as an imperial power in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and the military means by which that empire was acquired (and lost). It explores both soldiers' and sailors' lives and the effects of war on state formation and national identity within Britain.
2 hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above

  • Pre-1800 History Course
  • International Relations Approved
Fall This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. A. May Wednesday 3:30-4:30pm Syllabus

3414F - The Victorian Worldview: Nineteenth-Century Britain

This seminar examines the worldviews of men and women in nineteenth-century Britain: economic, political, social, and scientific, taking into account both conservative and radical perspectives. It also explores the domestic ideology commonly associated with the period, and the challenges posed to the Victorian domestic ideal.
2 seminar hours
Antirequisite(s): History 3432F/G, History 4423E, History 4420F/G
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Fall This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. A. May Thursday 9:30-11:30am Syllabus

3416G - The Holocaust

Examines why and how the Nazi government undertook to murder European Jews, and also the educated elite of Poland, Soviet POWs, Roma and Sinti, and the mentally handicapped. We examine the roles played by Hitler and close associates, contemporary responses to the murders, and the postwar historiography of the subject.
3 semiar hours

Antirequisite(s): The former History 3427E
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

  • International Relations Approved
Winter This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. E. Nathans Tuesday 10:30am-12:30pm
Thursday 10:30-11:30am
Syllabus

3602F - Crusaders and Muslims in the Holy Land

This course examines the social and economic factors behind the Crusades, both in medieval Europe and in the Middle East. It explores the Crusaders kingdom in the context of medieval Islam and Christianity, as a neighbor of the Islamic states, and as a link to Mediterranean Europe.
two-hour seminar.

Antirequisite(s): History 3605E
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

  • Pre-1800 History
  • International Relations Approved
Fall This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. M. Shatzmiller Tuesday 3:30-5:30pm Syllabus

3609G - Japan Since 1945

Selected topics, such as Japan's phenomenal economic growth, its competitive drive for the control of world markets, big business in politics, the debates on the Constitutional revision and remilitarization, student radicalism and the changing roles of women in contemporary Japan, are examined.
3 seminar hours

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

  • International Relations Approved
Winter This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. C. White Thursday 5:30-8:30pm Syllabus

3722G - 'Killing Fields': Genocide in Modern History

This seminar explores the causes, elements, and consequences of genocide in modern history through historical case studies and multidisciplinary perspectives.
2 hours, 0.5 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

  • International Relations Approved
Winter This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. F. Schumacher Friday 11:30am-1:30pm Syllabus

3723F - The Anthropocene: History of a Human Planet

Humans of late have exerted so much influence on the Earth, and created what are essentially permanent changes to it, that some scientists and scholars argue we are in a new age not just in human history, but in Earth history: the Anthropocene. This seminar course is a global environmental history of the recent past. 
3 seminar hours.

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

  • International Relations Approved
Fall This course will be offered in a virtual asynchronous format - on-line with no meeting time. A. MacEachern Online Syllabus

3813E - Public History

An exploration of history as it is understood by and interpreted for the public in varied venues and media, including museums, historic sites, historical fiction, the internet, and film. Topics include the history of public history, ethical practice, the relationships between form and content and between public and academic history.
2 seminar hours, 1.0 course

Prerequisite(s): 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above; or History 2811F/G and enrolment in the Minor in Public History.

Fall/Winter

This course will be offered in a virtual asynchronous format - on-line with no meeting time.

M. Dove Online Syllabus

3814G - Kicking & Screaming: Women's Protest Movements in 19th & 20th Century Canada & the United States

This course will focus on female protest movements whose primary goal was to better the lives of women. With attention to issues of gender, sexuality, race, and class, it will explore various conditions that gave rise to rebellion, and will assess the movements' strategies and achievements.
3 hours.

Antirequisite(s): History 2813F/G 
Prerequisite(s):
 1.0 course in History at the 2200 level or above.

Winter This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. M. Halpern Tuesday 1:30-3:30pm Syllabus

3823G - Global Twenty-First Century History

A thematic introduction to 21st-century history focused on phenomena that characterize our age: the global connectivity of supply chains, planetary-scale computation, the War on Terror, and unprecedented ecological change. Contemporary events are contextualized in an interdisciplinary fashion at time scales ranging from days to millions of years.
2 lecture hours.

Prerequisite(s):
 Any 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course.

  • International Relations Approved
Winter This course will be offered in a virtual synchronous format - on-line and at a dedicated time. W. Turkel Wednesday 11:30am-1:30pm Syllabus